Blacklisted Radio Live 4.19.2014

In this edition we discuss domestic terrorist dirty Harry Reid’s recent comments and updates on the Bundy Ranch. Also we turn focus the proxy wars in Syria, Ukraine, and the U.S. domestic police state.

  • Steven Lewis

    So Doug, how far back are you claiming Compton wasn’t a bad place? Just curious because I lived there for about 2 years 1958-59, and it was hell hole then. Each street in my area was its own gang. Once you went on the other side of the cross street you enter another gang’s territory. The cross streets had no homes on the (the corner homes were addressed to the street they sat on the corner of).

    I was a minority as a white boy and blacks and mexicans fought daily and not just the boys, the girls fought too. In second grade I had to fight off, with almost no success, these 5 black kids. But eventually they stopped because I just didn’t stand there and take it. And they didn’t care who they hit. Older boys about 17 would punch 6 or 7 year olds.

    Hopefully you will read this and next time you may not speak so quickly.

  • blacklistednews

    Great perspective, but I was referring to much earlier.

    A little history revisionist history from, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Compton,_California

    For many years, Compton was a much sought after neighborhood for the
    black middle class of Los Angeles. Now, only some areas of Compton are
    still middle class communities. This past affluence is reflected in the
    area’s appearance—Compton’s streets are lined with relatively spacious
    and attractive single family houses. However, several factors have
    contributed to Compton’s decline. One of the most significant factors
    was a steady erosion of its tax base. First, whites who fled to the newly incorporated cities of Artesia, Bellflower, Cerritos, Paramount and Norwalk in the late 1950s. These nearby communities remained largely white early on despite integration.[8] This move was even further precipitated after the Watts Riots in 1965 and 1992 Los Angeles riots.[9]